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What to do right now to get help for a loved one

If your loved one admits they have an opioid addiction…

Contact your primary physician. It’s important that he or she is part of the recovery plan, especially if the issue involves prescribed opioids.

Call a substance abuse outpatient clinic in order to determine your loved one’s medical condition, and what medical intervention steps may be needed. People with withdrawal symptoms may need stabilization medication. The assessment professional will also ask what kind of treatment the patient is willing to participate in. (For a complete list of treatment centers, see page 49.)

If you need help getting in touch with the right resources, call a hotline number such as the 24-hour addiction hotline for Buffalo and Erie County, 716-831-7007, or 211, Western New York’s confidential and free connection to health and human services.

If your loved one is in denial about an opioid addiction…

Look for family support resources, such as support groups or educational groups. This gives families an outlet to connect with other families who are going through the addiction process with a loved one, too. Horizon has a parent and family support group, and other support groups are listed on 211 WNY’s website.

If you need help getting in touch with the right resources, call a hotline number such as the 24-hour addiction hotline for Buffalo and Erie County, 716-831-7007, or 211, Western New York’s confidential and free connection to health and human services.

In an emergency situation…

Call 9-1-1 for a medical emergency

If a loved one is overdosing…

Call 9-1-1 for a medical emergency

Administer Narcan, something every family should have on hand. Narcan is a medication used to treat the effects of an opioid overdose. People can get Narcan at most pharmacies.

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